About

My name is Theodore (Theo) Knell, and among many other things I am a writer and poet.  TheoKnell

I was born on a cold and foggy March morning in 1952 at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, in the heart of London’s East End. At the time life in the East End of London was hard. Most of the area still lay in ruins following the Blitz. Rationing was in operation, and work was hard to find even for those with a skill.

My childhood was short and extremely brutal. My dad left us when I was just five years old. I learned how to fight and could hold my own on the streets long before I started school, and it seems like I’ve been fighting ever since. I was abandoned to a mental institution at the tender age of six where I stayed until I was ten. From there I was then sent to a state-run boarding school where I stayed until I was sixteen.

By the time I left secondary school, I had developed into a strong, independent, single-minded and very angry loner. On reflection, it was probably the perfect preparation for a life in the military, and ultimately Special Forces.

During my time I have served with, and met people from all walks of life. Everybody from world leaders to subsistence farmers. Some you wouldn’t follow in a bus queue or leave in charge of an empty pram. But there were others I would have willingly died for, and nearly did on more than one occasion.

After facing death on a number of occasions and winning through the one thing that life has taught me is that every new day is an adventure. A gift to be enjoyed and cherished and that, no matter how bad it gets, it’s always worth living and there is an upside to everything.

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5 responses to “About

  1. I have just finished reading A hell for Heroes and all I can say is: WOW! It was an excellent read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Read all the poems too and genuinely liked a few of them. They gave the book a really unique feel or character if you will, and one in particular just cut right through me. The chapter: We Could All Be Dead by Then, describing your battle against the 30+ force really took me there, as far as it is humanly possible just by reading about it and I had a adrenaline rush throughout… I hope all is well with you and all those you care about and wish you all the best. Thank you for sharing your story.

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    • Hi Martin

      Thanks very much for buying and reading the book, then taking the time to leave such a great comment, it’s very much appreciated. You and yours have a great weekend, and thanks again.

      Take care.

      Theo

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  2. I picked A Hell for Heroes off the shelf in a charity bookshop and read it at one sitting. For us non-military types, it is a fascinating revelation of one person’s experiences under extreme physical and psychological stress, both in training and in battle. For people like me it is a vicarious experience of how those extremes trigger certain reactions which people like Theo Knell had trained and prepared for and many others for which there can be little preparation. The effect on his family at the time of these events and the after-effects when he left the Special Forces he describes candidly.

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    • Hi Mike
      Thanks very much for your kind words there much appreciated. As a writer what is always an uplifting experience is when the reader finds your work both interesting and enjoyable.

      You take care, sir.
      Theo

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  3. Dear Theodore
    I’d be very interested in speaking to you about your publication Hell is for Heroes for a tv documentary and would be delighted if you were to get in touch with me.
    I’m looking forward to hearing from you, Best wishes,
    Marcella, Redplanet Pictures – Factual

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